Summertime Support

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Last year was our first offering our Plant The Seed Project programming. When we finished the school year, we realized there was an opportunity to create a year round gardening program with the addition of a summer camp. We tried to raise funds to offer a Plant The Seed Project Summer Camp via Kickstarter but were unsuccessful in our campaign. With that in mind, we went into 2018 looking to secure funds to do what we couldn't previously. The Wolcott Family Foundation supported our vision with grant funding and we were able to offer a 6-week camp for 40 students at no cost this past summer. 

During that time, our youth from a variety of local schools participated in the City of Denver's Youth One Book One Denver program and read the novel "Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus". This narrative about a young girl living with limb disorder provided a sturdy backbone for us, as it introduces several new characters, environments and situations as material for programming. For example, on day one each student made terrariums complete with cacti which they were able to nurture and take home on the last day of camp, inspired of course by the book's name. To gain a deeper understanding of our main character Aven's lifestyle, we had a visit from the City of Denver Office of Adaptive Recreation and participated in an obstacle course where each station replicated a different impairment or disability.

We didn't stop there. Our characters played the ukele, so we had Swallow Hill come and teach us a few songs. The folks from the Butterfly Pavilion came and let us play with tarantulas, cockroaches, and other animals we might see in the desert setting of our book. All while teaching us about the adaptations needed to survive in that rugged climate.

Last but certainly not least, we loaded up the school bus and trekked down to the Civic Center to meet the author Dusti Bowling in person. There she explained how losing a close relative who had a limb disorder and having a husband and children with tic disorders led her to write a book about characters that reflected their realities. After signing our books, and letting us take some time to ask questions, we headed back home- hopefully with new perspectives on people, plants and animals alike. With your help, we can do it again.